Ingredient – calcium lactate

Name: calcium lactate

Colour: white powder

Flavour: no real flavour, slight acidic aftertaste

Chemical composition: C6H10CaO6

E number:  E327

calcium lactateWhat is it?

Calcium lactate is a salt that is used as an ingredient in food and medicine.

Where does it come from?

Calcium lactate can be black or white and is made through a chemical reaction between lactic acid and calcium carbonate or lactic acid and calcium hydroxide.

How is it used?

In medicine it is most commonly used as an antacid and to treat calcium deficiencies. In food it can be found in aged cheese as small crunchy bits – these are calcium lactate crystals. These crystals are formed (as a precipitate) when bacteria (used in the ripening process) convert lactic acid to the less soluble form. It is also an ingredient of baking powder and can be used to extend the shelf life of fresh cut fruit. Calcium lactate may also be added to sugar-free foods to prevent tooth decay and when added to chewing gum that contains xylitol it increases the rate of tooth enamel remineralisation.

How is it used in molecular gastronomy?

In MG it is used to create caviar and bubbles. It is often added to the solution that you are sphericating (? Is that even a word?).

Where can I buy it?

You can buy it in our shop by itself or in kit form with instructions.

2 thoughts on “Ingredient – calcium lactate

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